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Milton Bertrand 280 articles

How do you sustain a revolution after it is launched?

  • Posted by Milton Bertrand
  • August 23, 2014 12:39 AM EDT
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Here is this question in one of the photographs; how do you launch a revolution? As there is a major decline in STEM related fields my question to you how do you sustain a revolution after it is launched?
I am Milton Bertrand an evangelist of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). It is not by accident rather the importance of these fields in our daily affair. I recently took a trip to Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex (KSCVC). It is the visitor center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida just east of Orlando in Titusville. The complex features many great exhibits and displays, historic spacecraft and memorabilia, shows, two IMAX theaters, a range of buses that takes you around of the space complex, the Shuttle Launch Experience, a simulated ride into space. In addition, there are the Apollo/Saturn V Center and United States Astronaut Hall of Fame. The visitor complex is self sustaining. It does not use any tax payers to operate.  There are so many things to explore and see. I cannot put all of them in words. However, I have taken some photographs and I would like to share some with you.

The complex is not amusement park; it is indeed an educational park. In my humble opinion, it should have been a place for every U.S. student to visit before graduating from high school. If you ever dreamed of exploring space, you should definitely visit KSCVC to experience it. The pictures that you see on TV are far from the true size of these rockets. These rockets are amazing; it is a great reminder of true American ingenuity. The final mission of the United States' Apollo lunar landing program was Apollo 17 in 1972; it was the sixth and last landing of humans on the Moon. The agency had plan for Apollo 18, 19, and 20.  All the rockets and spacecraft (18, 19 and 20) had been built for the expeditions. Apollo 18 rocket is part of the exhibit.  The size of this beauty is amazing. But it was never NASA’s plan to have the Apollo missions end with 17. They were canceled for a variety of reasons, including changes in technical direction, turmoil fueled by the Vietnam War, soaring inflation, and social upheaval. The shuttle Atlantis is also on display there.
 
In Addition, I had an opportunity to meet Astronaut John Blaha. He is an amazing individual with a great sense of humor.  He became an astronaut in 1980; he has spent over 3864 hours in space on five space missions. In 1989, Blaha piloted shuttle Discovery.  As he explained, the crew performed several scientific experiments. Also in 1989, Blaha piloted the STS-33 Department of Defense mission. In 1991, Blaha flew aboard shuttle Atlantis. This mission consisted of several life science experiments. In 1993, Blaha conducted more experiments aboard shuttle Columbia. Blaha also spent four months aboard the Russian Mir Space Station. He returned to Earth aboard STS-81 in January 1997.
 
Here is this question in one of the photographs; how do you launch a revolution?
 
As there is a major decline in STEM related fields my question to you how do you sustain a revolution after it is launched?

 
After all, KSCVC is a place that can inspire you to do something different or inspire the future generation